Penrose Library | Whitman College

Find Resources

by Danielle Hirano  Oct 19 15
Whitman Catalog

The catalog, which is accessible via Sherlock, will help you find materials in Penrose, including links to eBooks and eJournals.

Summit & WorldCat

Search Summit via the dropdown menu in Sherlock to find resources at other libraries and have them sent here. Find out more about using Summit and Interlibrary Loan.

Course Reserves

Find materials your instructor has put on reserve. You can look up course materials by course name or number or by your instructor’s name.

Articles & Databases

Find scholarly articles by searching our databases and online journals.

Journals & Newspaper Titles

Do you know the name of the journal or newspaper you need? You can find it by searching our catalog in Sherlock, or our Journal Finder.

Archives & Special Collections

The Whitman College and Northwest Archives holds rare books, historical manuscripts related to the Walla Walla region, and records related to the college.

Faculty Services

by Danielle Hirano  Oct 16 15

Library Instruction

As detailed in the Penrose Library Mission and Guiding Principles, the Instructional and Research Services department guides students through the research process, helping them develop critical thinking skills to conduct research, synthesize information, and communicate the results of intellectual inquiry.

Scheduling an Instructional Session

You may request an instructional session for your class. We work with students to help them develop search strategies, find and evaluate resources, and use resources effectively in coursework. And we will work with you to tailor our instruction to meet your specific course needs. Our program of instruction is developed in collaboration with classroom faculty to build general information literacy skills and is designed to fit into the framework of your course.

Instruction provides students with

  • information tailored to course projects and assignments
  • exposure to discipline-specific research tools
  • hands-on experience with relevant print and electronic resources
  • experience with research strategies and information literacy skills

Instruction includes presentations and hands-on active learning components, as well as class discussion. You may schedule an instruction session in the Center for Teaching and Learning, college classrooms or college computer labs. Please contact Lee Keene (509-527-5917), Head of Instructional and Research Services, to schedule your session.

Library Liaisons

Departmental liaisons are available to share information about library resources and services and discuss course-related library instruction. Current liaisons assignments are as follows.

Division I

Anthropology — Lee Keene — 509-527-5917

Economics — Roger Stelk — 509-527-5909

History — Melissa Salrin — 509-527-4731

Politics — Lee Keene — 509-527-5917

Psychology — Julie Carter — 509-527-5915

Sociology — Julie Carter — 509-527-5915

Division II

Art — Melissa Salrin — 509-527-4731

Art History & Visual Culture Studies — Melissa Salrin — 509-527-4731

Classics — Ben Murphy — 509-527-5918

English — Lee Keene — 509-527-5917

Foreign Languages — Amy Blau — 509-527-4905

Music — Ben Murphy — 509-527-5918

Philosophy — Ben Murphy — 509-527-5918

Religion — Ben Murphy — 509-527-5918

Rhetoric — Ben Murphy — 509-527-5918

Spanish — Amy Blau — 509-527-4905

Theatre — Ben Murphy — 509-527-5918

Division III

Astronomy — Roger Stelk — 509-527-5909

Biology — Roger Stelk — 509-527-5909

Chemistry — Amy Blau — 509-527-4905

Geology — Julie Carter — 509-527-5915

Math & Computer Science — Kun Lin — 509-527-5916

Physics — Amy Blau — 509-527-4905

Interdisciplinary Programs

Asian Studies — Lee Keene — 509-527-5917

Biochemistry, Biophysics & Molecular Biology — Roger Stelk — 509-527-5909

Encounters — Amy Blau — 509-527-4905

Environmental Studies — Lee Keene — 509-527-5917

Film & Media Studies — Roger Stelk — 509-527-5909

Gender Studies — Dalia Corkrum — 509-527-5193

Global Studies — Lee Keene — 509-527-5917

Race & Ethnic Studies — Dalia Corkrum — 509-527-5193

Sports Studies, Recreation & Athletics — Lee Keene — 509-527-5917

Writing Center — Lee Keene — 509-527-5917

Course Reserves

The purpose of placing materials on reserve is to make common readings readily available to students for a short amount of time. Reserves also allow a faculty member to provide students with controlled access to items not in the Library’s own collection, such as personal copies. Faculty members may place items on either print reserve or electronic reserve (e-reserves).

How to place an item on reserve

Please complete a Reserve Request Form (PDF), listing all items you will be placing on reserve. You can choose to place items on reserve for the following loan periods:

  • 3 hours (library use only)
  • 24 hours (items can be taken out of the library)
  • 6 days

To guarantee that your materials are available for the beginning of the semester, submit them no later than two weeks before the first day of classes. Once the semester has begun, allow at least four days for processing.

Materials to be placed on e-reserve that are already in electronic format may be emailed to Jen Pope. Materials to be scanned, or put on reserve in their original format, should be accompanied by a Reserve Request Form, brought to the circulation desk and given to the Circulation Supervisor on duty.

What can be put on reserve?
  • Library books, videos, CDs, and DVDs
    Please gather together the library materials you would like on reserve for your courses. Reference books and periodicals do no circulate outside the library and are not normally placed on reserve.
  • Books not owned by the library
    The Library will attempt to purchase books needed for reserve use. You may request them by contacting the Acquisitions Department. Please be sure to indicate that the item is for reserve, and provide the course number.
  • Personal books, videos, CDs, and DVDs
    Personal copies may be placed on reserve if the Library does not own the item. Please mark these with your name. Note: Personal copies must be marked and barcoded for use with our circulation system. The Library cannot assume liability for materials that are worn, torn, mutilated, or stolen.
  • Photocopies
    Faculty are responsible for providing clean, single-sided, unstapled photocopies. Photocopies must be accompanied by a Reserve Request Form and a full bibliographic citation. The Library subscribes to a number of databases that allow durable links to journal and newspaper articles. The Library will link to materials through library databases when possible.
  • Required vs. Recommended Reading
    Space is limited on reserve shelves, so only those materials that are required reading, viewing, or listening for coursework are put on reserve. Items which are recommended but not required should not be placed on reserve.
  • Summit and ILL materials will not be placed on reserve–no exceptions!
  • Textbooks
    Textbooks will be placed on reserve only when the Bookstore has insufficient copies to meet demand and additional copies are on order.
  • Items may not remain on reserve indefinitely. All items are removed from reserve at the end of each term.
View a Reserve List

You can view or search for your reserve lists on the Course Reserves page. As soon as items are placed on reserve, they will be available for check-out. It may take up to 48 hours before they appear in Sherlock.

Reserves and Copyright

Note that putting copies of articles or chapters on reserve may violate U.S. copyright laws. In some cases, faculty members should request permission from the publisher, who is usually the copyright holder. Addresses of the publisher are usually listed in the front of the copyrighted material. If you need help determining copyright owner or publisher address, please ask a librarian.

Permission should usually be requested in the following situations:

  • The copyrighted material placed on Reserve is being used for more than one semester.
  • If you wish to put more than a brief amount of copyrighted material on reserve.

Questions? Please contact Jen Pope.

Honors Thesis FAQ for Faculty

All honors thesis students must deposit both print and digital copies of their thesis with Penrose Library. For faculty, key points include the following:

Where can I find thesis submission guidelines?

Complete guidelines on formatting and submission can be found here.

When is the deadline?

Both print and digital theses are due in the library no later than Reading Day of Spring Semester.

Where are thesises submitted?

Print copies are to be turned in to Penrose Library Administrative Assistant.

How do students submit digital copies?

Digital copies will be uploaded by students in PDF/A format for long-term storage and preservation by the library. Students may find instructions via the library website for formatting and submitting their thesises as PDF/A.

What do I need to sign?
  • Faculty advisors must sign the certificate of approval form for the print copies of the thesis.
  • In addition to submitting their PDF/A thesis, honors thesis students and faculty advisors must sign a Non-Exclusive Distribution License. On this form, students and faculty must indicate whether they would like the thesis to be accessible via the Internet and Interlibrary Loan to users unaffiliated with Whitman, or to restrict access to Whitman affiliated patrons (students, faculty and staff). This form also allows a hold (or embargo period) to be placed on access to the thesis if the author(s) or advisors plan to publish or seek a patent based on work in the thesis. Students will be responsible for bringing this form to faculty to sign, but it is a good idea to begin conversations about the level of access that will be assigned to the thesis.
Do student rentain their copyright?

Granting the College (and the Library) the right to provide electronic access to the thesis does not transfer copyright; the student author(s) retain the rights to their work.

How can students learn more?

The library will offering a workshop for students on these submission guidelines. Times and locations will be announced through the library website.

Who do I contact with questions?

Melissa Salrin, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian ([email protected] 509-526-4731)
Ben Murphy, Instructional and Research Librarian ([email protected] 509-527-5918)

Collection Development

Suggest a Purchase

Tell us if there’s something we should have in our collection. We have access to Choice Reviews Online to help you keep up with what’s being published in your field. Or sign up for GOBI Notifications and find out when new books in your field are published.

Library Collection Development Policy (PDF)

Collection Development Process (PDF)

How to sign-up GOBI notification:

The library’s primary book vendor is YBP (Yankee Book Peddler). As books are published, they are added to YBP’s online database, GOBI (Global Online Bibliographic Information). In some instances, books are sent automatically to the library “on approval” while others are designated for notification.

The GOBI system allows faculty the option of reviewing notification slips of recently published material. A profile detailing the faculty member’s specific areas of interest serves as the basis for this service. The alerts are generated by YBP every Saturday morning and appear in your email inbox.

Just click on the link embedded in the email to access the list of new titles. Then select the titles that you want to recommend for purchase. Once you have chosen all of the titles that you want to select, click Recommend to send the selections to the Collection Management librarian. Orders for the titles are generated and the material arrives at the library in a few weeks. If you are interested in establishing a profile for the GOBI Notification service, please contact Roger Stelk, Collection Management librarian, at [email protected], or by phone at 509-527-5909.

gobi notification

Data Management

What is a Data Management Plan?

Since 2011, researchers applying for NSF grants have been required to submit a supplementary Data Management Plan (DMP) of no more than two pages with their grant applications. The Data Management Plan outlines how data will be gathered, preserved, and shared, in accordance with NSF policies.

What is the NSF data sharing policy?

The National Science Foundation stipulates that “investigators are expected to share with other researchers, at no more than incremental cost and within a reasonable time, the primary data, samples, physical collections, and other supporting materials created or gathered in the course of the work under NSF grants.”

What should the Data Management Plan include?

The NSF lays out the requirements for the DMP in their Grant Proposal Guide. The DMP should include information explaining:

  1. The types of data, samples, physical collections, software, curriculum materials, and other materials to be produced in the course of the project.
  2. The standards to be used for data and metadata format and content.
  3. Policies for access and sharing, including provisions for appropriate protection of privacy, confidentiality, security, intellectual property, and other rights or requirements.
  4. Policies and provisions for re-use, re-distribution, and the production of derivatives.
  5. Plans for archiving data, samples, and other research products, and for preservation of and access to them.

Some Directorates, Offices, Divisions, and Programs have specific requirements beyond those outlined above. Please check the NSF website to find out whether your grant proposal will require additional components.

Some questions to consider
  1. What types of data will be produced? How much data, and how often will it be changed or updated? Will versions need to be tracked?
  2. What identifiers will be used for the data? What file formats will be produced, and will special software or tools be required to create or view the data? What metadata standards will be used to organize the data?
  3. Who is responsible for managing and controlling the data? Who owns the data? If private and confidential data is being collected, what provisions are in place to protect that information?
  4. Where will the data be stored? How secure is the data, and what back up procedures exist?
  5. For whom is the data intended? How long must it be retained?
  6. How will you make the necessary data publicly accessible? How do you intend to publish or distribute the data?
What resources are available to help write a Data Management Plan, and to make data publicly available?

There are links to questionnaires and other tools that can be helpful in preparing a Data Management Plan on the Penrose Library Data Resources LibGuide.

Data Services librarian Amy Blau [email protected](509-527-4905) is available to discuss various aspects of data management.

If you are planning to submit an NSF grant, please contact Rachna Sinnott (509-527-5990) or Tana Park (509-527-5926) in the Office of Grants & Foundation Relations at least one month before the due date. They can provide guidance on grant submission procedures and compliance with College and federal requirements, including the Data Management Plan. For more information on Whitman’s policies and procedures regarding grant submission, please visit the Grants & Foundation Relations website.

We’ve put together some great resources to help you navigate copyright in your academic and personal life, including fair use analysis tools and sample copyright request forms. The Whitman College Copyright Policy and procedures for use of copyrighted materials are also available.

Honors Thesis

by Danielle Hirano  Oct 16 15

Declaration of Intent for Honors Thesis

The Library acquires copies of honors theses to serve the needs of students and faculty, to provide access to Whitman College scholarship outside the Whitman community, and to ensure that these original works are available to researchers for consultation in the future.

Approval by Advisor(s)

The thesis or project must be approved in advance by the professor(s) under whose direction the work is being done.

Before October 12, 2015, submit the Honors in Major Study Application to department/committee chair. As part of the Honors in Major Study program, the candidate must complete a written thesis or research project to the satisfaction of this program and file copies (both physical and digital) of the thesis in the college library prior to the final examination period in his or her last semester. For the 2015-2016 academic year, the thesis submission deadline is reading day, May 11, 2016 (December 11, 2015 for Fall submission). Please note that students may be required to comply with departmental regulations for earlier filing. Changes and/or exceptions in requirements or deadlines must be approved by the Board of Review.

Departments are asked to distribute these guidelines to all honors students whose theses will be acquired by the Library. The guidelines are to be followed by the students in the preparation of their honors theses.

Writing and Formatting Your Honors Thesis

Thesis Template

Seniors have the option to use a correctly formatted thesis template which includes required elements such as the title page, certificate of approval, table of contents, etc. The template is not required; it is designed to facilitate proper formatting and pagination.

Download the Thesis Template (MS Word)


The thesis should follow requirements set forth by the home department or developed in consultation with the thesis advisor. Generally, one of the formats described in the Modern Language Association (MLA), Chicago Manual of Style, American Psychological Association or other standard style manuals should be used. Guides illustrating correct formatting (e.g, for footnotes, bibliographies, etc.) are available in the library (see Style Guides) and in the College Bookstore.

Page Size

Unless approval by the departments and the Library is granted because of a need for a different format, the thesis page size must be 8½ × 11 inches.

Margins, Spacing, and Type

The left margin must be at least 1 ½ inches wide. All other margins must be at least 1 inch wide. The text should be double-spaced, but extended quotations may be single-spaced if indented slightly from each margin. Text should be in a standard font, no larger than 14 point and no smaller than 10 points.


For preliminary pages (title page, table of contents, etc.), use lower case Roman numerals at the bottom center of the page. Include the title page in the count but do not number it.

For the text (thesis, appendices, etc.), use Arabic numerals at the bottom center of the page. Include the first page of the text in the count but do not number it. First pages of new sections (bibliography, chapters, etc.) should also be numbered at the bottom center.

Other styles of pagination such as MLA or APA may be used if approved by the department or thesis advisor.

Images, Audio, Video, and Other Media

Theses including such materials should be prepared according to the special instructions below. Additional questions on special materials may be referred to the Special Collections Librarian at [email protected].


Digital images, maps, charts, and graphs, unless otherwise specified by academic department or thesis advisor should have a resolution of 300 dots per inch (dpi). If this resolution is not available, consideration must be made to get as close to this resolution as possible without considerable visual degradation of the image be inserted into the thesis using the TIFF (preferred) or JPEG file formats.

For help with creating, scanning, formatting or otherwise preparing images, maps, charts, or graphs, please contact the WCTS Multimedia Development Lab (MDL) in Hunter at [email protected].


Copies of material in non-print format—DVDs, CDs, videos, etc.—should be included with each copy of the thesis deposited with the library. Media contents shall be formatted in accordance to guidelines set by the academic department and/or thesis advisor.


The usual make-up of the thesis is as follows:

1. Title page

In order to ensure consistency among Whitman theses, the title page should closely follow the sample with respect to order, spacing, and capitalization. In general, abbreviations should not be used. The author’s name must be typed in full as it is to appear on the commencement program.

2. Certificate of approval

The completed thesis must be approved by the professor under whose direction the work was done. Use the sample certification of approval form as a guide. The certificate of approval must be signed by the thesis advisor and placed in the thesis following the title page. NOTE: This is not the same form as the Honors in Major Study Application for the department/committee chair before due in the Registrar’s Office before the October break.

3. Table of contents

Depending on departmental requirements, most theses must have a table of contents immediately following the certificate of approval. It must list all the principal topics or subdivisions of the thesis and their initial page numbers.

4. Abstract

An abstract in your thesis helps users identify, retrieve, and use the thesis. See the appropriate style guide for your discipline for instructions on writing an abstract. While the Library does not require your thesis to contain an abstract within it, we do require an abstract submitted to us as part of the digital submission form. If you choose to include an abstract within the contents of your thesis, you may copy and paste this into the digital submission form. A simple paragraph will do. The abstract helps us determine how to link to your thesis in our online catalog.

5. List of illustrations

All figures, tables, charts, graphs, drawings, plates and other illustrations are to be listed on a page following the table of contents, numbered consecutively in either Arabic or Roman numerals in the order in which they appear in the thesis. The number of the illustration(s) should appear at the left of each entry, and the page number on which each illustration appears should be indicated at the right of the entry.

6. Text Format (Discipline Specific)

Text should follow the style (APA, Chicago, MLA, etc.) of the thesis discipline. For more information, see “Formatting” and consult your thesis advisor.

7. Bibliography

The bibliography shall be placed following the text in a form approved for use by the academic department. Guides illustrating the correct use and form of bibliographies are available in the library (see “Style Guides”) and in the College Bookstore.

Copyright information

If you are the author of all the text, image, audio, and/or video files contained in your honors thesis, you hold copyright and can grant full permission to post a digital copy online. If portions of your materials have been produced by others, you need to seek permission to include them in the digital copy you post online. If permission cannot be obtained, copyrighted material should be removed from any digital copy you post and complete print copies can be placed in the Library collection. For more information, see the library’s tutorial on copyright at Whitman or contact Dalia Corkrum, Library Director, at [email protected].

Printing and Submission of Your Thesis

Theses are due prior to the final examination period in the student’s last semester (except when the student may be required to comply with departmental regulations for earlier filing). Changes and/or exceptions in requirements or deadlines must be approved by the Board of Review.

Students are required to submit both print and digital versions of their work to the Library. Please note the following guidelines:

Printed Version: What to print and submit (and where):

The library will only require one single-sided, black & white* copy of your honors thesis. Submit it unbound to the Sharon Lederer in the College Librarian’s office, Penrose Library, room 213. This copy will be added to the Library’s circulating collection and be made available for circulation to other libraries through interlibrary loan. The library will print a second copy from your digital submission to be deposited in the Whitman College Archives. Be sure that your final printed thesis conforms to the formatting guidelines, paying particular attention to the Title Page and the need for signed Certificates of Approval.
* The print copy may contain color charts, graphs, etc. only if the graphics are preceded by a blank sheet and they are printed on a color laser printer.

How to Print:

Print one-sided, not two-sided “duplexed” on a laser printer


Unless prior approval is obtained by the academic department, the thesis must be 8½ × 11 inches in size. Library copies must be printed on a minimum of 20-lb weight paper that has a minimum 25% cotton content.Penrose Library will provide free, archival quality paper for seniors submitting theses. Paper will be available approximately one week before the deadline and stocked in the thesis printer on the main floor of the library. Check with a librarian or the WCTS Help Desk in the library if you will be submitting early.

Ink Color

Text must be in black ink.

Printer locations

Theses may be printed on the designated thesis printer at the WCTS-staffed Technology Support Desk in the Library.

Cost (if printed on College-owned laser printers)

Black & White and Color printing is charged through the GoPrint pay system. Seniors working on their thesis may request an additional $15 of GoPrint credit. The request may be made by emailing [email protected] with the name of the thesis advisor and the academic department for which the thesis is being written. Black and White printing is charged at the rate of $0.05 per page single-sided or $0.045 per page for duplex. Color printing is charged at the rate of $0.50 per single-sided page.

Personal Bound Copies

Students desiring to have personal copies of theses bound at their expense can order copies for $18 each, including tax and shipping.There is no limit to the number of personal copies you may order.Provide one complete copy of your thesis for every personal bound copy ordered.

To order bound copies, please fill out the online order form.

Payment can be made by charge to your student account or by check (made out to “Penrose Library, Whitman College”). Checks can be turned in to Sharon Lederer. Personal copies may be printed on any printer, without special paper requirement.

Digital (PDF/A) Version

In addition to the deposit of paper copies, each student must deposit with the library a copy of the thesis in digital form.

Copyright: In order to include any text, images, audiovisual, or other material not created by you, the material must be in the public domain or fall within the parameters of fair use. If the material does not fall within either of those categories, authors must receive permission from the copyright owner to include that material in their digital thesis. For more information, see the library’s tutorial on copyright at Whitman or contact Dalia Corkrum, Library Director, at [email protected].

The author of the thesis must complete a non-exclusive distribution license and select a level of access, subject to thesis advisor’s approval:

1. Worldwide distribution via the Internet, or

2. Local distribution only to authorized users of Whitman’s network

If the thesis is co-authored, all authors, even those not earning honors designation, must sign the non-exclusive distribution license. All thesis co-authors and thesis advisor(s) should sign the same form. Submit the non-exclusive distribution license to the Library by the Reading Day due date.

The digital copy must be a pdf/a file. Create one by following the pdf/a instruction sheet while using Adobe Acrobat XI on either of the two computers closest to the Penrose Circulation Desk. Students with questions about digital formatting should contact the WCTS Multimedia Development Lab in Hunter Conservatory at [email protected] Combine the Thesis Title page and Certificate of Approval Form that only contains the advisor’s name (no signature) together with your thesis into a single PDF/A file. When you’ve completed all the guideliness listed above, you’re ready to fill out the digital thesis submission form by the Reading Day due date.

Note: If your PDF file size is greater than 25MB, instead of uploading your PDF/A file, bring the file on a flash drive to Sharon Lederer in Rm. 213. A digital thesis submission form is still required.

Checklist of Key Due Dates and Requirements

1. Submit the Honors in Major Study Application to department/committee chair before October break.

Optional: download and begin using the Thesis Template.

2. Submit a paper copy of thesis to Sharon Lederer in Penrose Library no later than Reading Day of spring semester. Paper copies must include:

a thesis title page that closely follows the sample (click to view sample)

a certificate of approval form signed by thesis advisor.

3. Submit a digital version (required):

Submit a pdf/a version through the digital submission form by Reading Day due date.

Sign and submit the non-exclusive distribution license–note, all co-authors and thesis advisors must sign the same form. Submit form to Sharon Lederer by Reading Day of spring semestep.

Please note: for complete instructions on #2 and #3, please see the Printing and Submission page.

Digital Thesis Submission Form

Please click: Digital Thesis Submission Form to start your digital submission process.

Citing Sources

by Danielle Hirano  Oct 14 15

Different disciplines have different ways of formatting research papers and citing sources. Check with your Professor to be sure you’re using the preferred style for your course.

Citation Help

Style Guides

ACS (American Chemical Society)
APA (American Psychological Association
ASA (American Sociological Association)
Chicago Manual of Style & Turabian
MLA (Modern Language Association)

Policies and Forms

by Danielle Hirano  Oct 14 15

Research Services

by Danielle Hirano  Oct 14 15

The Whitman College and Northwest Archives provides basic reference services during its regular hours. Consultations with archives staff may be scheduled during these or other times.

Researchers are encouraged to contact the archives prior to a visit. The archives is open to the public and complies with the access guidelines of the Society of American Archivists. Users are required to follow standard access procedures and complete standard access forms during research visits.

Requests that require research into the holdings of the Whitman College and Northwest Archives may be completed for a fee. A basic fee of $25 will be charged for the first hour of research; additional time will be billed at $12.50 per half hour. The basic fee of $25 must be paid in advance, in the form of check payable to Whitman College and Northwest Archives. This fee includes postage and up to 20 photocopies; additional copies are $.10 per page. Digital scans may be obtained for $10 per image.


The Whitman College and Northwest Archives staff is available to make presentations and exhibit primary source, contextual, and subject-specific materials to classes and groups. In addition, the archives is able to make available digital copies of many of its historic resources for educational purposes.


Researchers wishing to photocopy materials in the archives must first consult archives staff. Certain materials may be copied by the researcher in the archives reading room. Fragile materials will be reproduced at the discretion of and by archives staff. Archives staff may refuse to reproduce materials owned by other repositories.Fees may be paid by cash or check.

  • Black and white photocopies: $.10 per page
  • Color photocopies: $.50 per page
  • Digital scans: $10.00 per image (for originals larger than 11×17″, $20.00 per image)
  • Photographic reproductions: minimum charge of $15.00 for an 8×10” print
  • VHS or DVD copies: $25 per tape/disc.

Please note that permission to publish or display reproduced images must be applied for separately (see below)

For information regarding reproduction fees for Whitman College faculty, students, staff, and alumni, please contact archives staff.


Researchers wishing to quote from, publish, or display materials from the archives must complete a Permission to Publish form.

Fee Schedule
$10 per image
Use Fee
Publication Use
Commercial Publishers $40 per image
Nonprofit Organizations and Agencies $10 per image
Academic Publishers
Thesis, Dissertation (Unpublished) No fee
Advertising Use
For-profit Organizations and Individuals $100 per image
Nonprofit Organizations and Agencies $25 per image
Video, Television, Film, CD-ROM Use (Per Still Image)
For-profit Organizations and Individuals $100 per image
Nonprofit Organizations and Agencies $25 per image
Internet, Web Site Use $100 per image
Exhibition / Display Use
For-profit Organizations and Individuals $100 per image
Nonprofit Organizations and Agencies $25 per image
Special Use On Request
Waived Fees

Permission fees are routinely waived for the Whitman community, including current faculty, staff, and students as well as for college offices and publications. Fees are also waived for black-and-white reproduction of a few images of textual or visual materials reproduced within the covers of a scholarly journal, in an academic monograph published in a press run of fewer than 2,000 copies, and in scholarly microform or electronic editions. Even when permission fees are waived, reproduction fees may still apply and the Permission to Publish form must be submitted.

Union-Bulletin Inquiries

Two ways to gain access to articles and obituaries published in the Walla Walla Union-Bulletin or other local newspapers:

  1. Microfilms are available on the ground (first) floor of Penrose Library in the Whitman College and Northwest Archives and may be accessed Monday through Friday 10:00-noon and 1:00-4:00.
  2. Freelance researchers unaffiliated with the archives are available to locate and copy articles and obituaries for a fee. Research fees must be paid in advance, whether or not the search yields the desired articles. The research fee schedule is as follows:
    • $25.00 minimum charge for up to one hour of research. Patrons will be contacted if the first hour of research yields no results.
    • $12.50 per half hour after the first hour
    • Each hour of research includes 20 copies. Additional copies cost 10¢ per page.
    • Large numbers of copies or CDs may require additional charges for postage or supplies.
    • Please make all payments by check, payable to the individual researcher.

Email research requests to: Gayle or Donna

Requests may also be mailed to: Donna Cummins, Memorial 302, Whitman College, 345 Boyer Avenue, Walla Walla, WA 99362.

Resources for Genealogists

Several basic genealogical sources are available in the Penrose Library and the Whitman College and Northwest Archives.

Federal and Territorial Censuses – Penrose Library, Main (2nd) Floor, “Books on Microfilm” Cabinet
  • Enumeration sheets provide information about the address, nationality, citizenship, profession, and literacy of every member of a given household.
  • Penrose Library has the following census records on microfilm:
    • 7th Federal Census, Oregon Territory, 1850
    • 8th Federal Census, Washington Territory, 1860
    • 9th Federal Census, Washington State, 1870
    • 10th Federal Census, Washington State, 1880
    • 12th Federal Census, Washington State, 1900
    • 13th Federal Census, Washington State, 1910
    • Washington Territory Census Rolls, 1871-1892
    • Provisional and Territorial Census Records of Oregon, 1842-1859

Penrose Library does not have a name index for the census or enumeration district maps.

Newspapers – Penrose Library, 1st Floor, Whitman College and Northwest Archives
  • Local newspapers available in Penrose Library:
    • Walla Walla Union Bulletin (and all preceding Walla Walla newspapers), Newspaper Cabinet #28, 29, 1861-ongoing
    • Waitsburg Times, Newspaper Cabinet #27, 1881-ongoing
    • Dayton Chronicle, Newspaper Cabinet #2, 1917-1957
    • Whitman College Pioneer, Newspaper Cabinet #30, 1893-ongoing
  • None of these newspapers is indexed. To locate articles, you must know an approximate date of publication.
Directories – Penrose Library, 1st Floor, and in the Whitman College and Northwest Archives
  • Walla Walla County and City Directories are located in the Northwest Collection on the first floor (1911-1997) and in the archives reading room (1880-2000).
Yearbooks – Whitman College and Northwest Archives Reading Room
  • Whitman College Academic Catalogues (1882- )
  • Whitman College Yearbooks, Waiilatpu (1906-1997)
  • Walla Walla High School Yearbooks (1915-2000)
Other resources – Whitman College and Northwest Archives
  • Ogle’s Standard Atlas of Walla Walla County, 1909 (contains plat maps)
  • Vertical clipping files on “Whitman College People” and “Northwest People,” dates unknown

If you would like assistance with your research, please contact the Walla Walla Valley Genealogical Society.

Finding Primary Resources Elsewhere

Northwest Digital Archives: Provides access to finding aids from historical repositories in the Pacific Northwest.

Washington State Digital Archives: Digital full-text access to select public records, including birth, death, and census records.

National Union Catalog of Manuscript Collections (NUCMC): A database of catalog records for archival collections held by institutions throughout the United States.

American Memory: A free, full text electronic archive of images, sounds and texts from 19th- and 20th- century America.

Repositories of Primary Source: A directory of web sites for archives and manuscript repositories throughout the world. An excellent place to find contact information for archives and archivists in any region you are studying.

City of Walla Walla Online Records

Fort Walla Walla Museum

Kirkman House Museum

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute Interpretive Center for the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla Tribes

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District

Washington State Library’s Classics in Washington History (includes Lyman’s History of Old Walla Walla County)

Whitman Mission National Historical Site

Our Collections

by Danielle Hirano  Oct 14 15

The Whitman College and Northwest Archives houses over 3500 linear feet of manuscript and archival material and about 5,000 rare books. Major collections include:

College Archives: Official and unofficial records, publications, select personal papers of faculty, staff, and alumni/ae, and other materials that document the history of Whitman College (chartered in 1883) and its predecessor, Whitman Seminary (chartered in 1859).

Northwest Manuscripts Collection: Manuscripts and records from individuals and organizations of significance to the history of the Walla Walla region. Materials in the collection range from the personal papers of some of the earliest missionaries in the region, including Marcus and Narcissa Whitman (1836), to records of contemporary local businesses and organizations, such as the Walla Walla Woman’s Reading Club (1894-1995).

Myron Eells Library of Northwest History: Rare Pacific Northwest Americana and a growing, circulating collection of books and periodicals about the Northwest. Highlights include some of the first books printed in the Northwest at the Lapwai Mission Press (1839-45) and other early Northwest imprints.

Elbridge H. And Evelyn Clark Stuart Napoleon Collection: Books, furniture, and artifacts associated with Napoleon Bonaparte and the Napoleonic era. Highlights of the collection include a desk used by Napoleon’s surgeon on the island of St. Helena, William Mudford’s An Historical Account of the Battle of Waterloo (1816), and William Ireland’s Life of Napoleon (1822).

Vernon H. McFarlane Collection: About 130 illustrated books from the 15th to the 19th centuries. Highlights include a Nuremberg Chronicle (1493) and a number of rare atlases and Bibles.

Book Arts and Small Press Collection: Over 300 artists’ books and small press imprints, including works produced by the Dogwood Press and books created by college faculty, students, and the Whitman Book Arts program.

Collection Development Policy

The Whitman College and Northwest Archives is the institutional repository for Whitman College and functions as the final repository for the official records of the college, including college publications, institutional records, and other materials created by college employees in the course of performing their work. The archives also collects unofficial records of individuals and groups affiliated with the college, including records of student groups, personal papers and other materials created by faculty, staff, and alumni/ae, and Whitmaniana (artifacts bearing the emblem of the college).

The Whitman College and Northwest Archives collects materials documenting the history of Walla Walla region from the arrival of the first white settlers to the present. Local history records of interest include records of Walla Walla organizations, businesses, and educational and cultural institutions and personal papers and other materials that highlight important dimensions of Walla Walla history.

The Whitman College and Northwest Archives also maintains a rare book collection. Strengths of the collection include Pacific Northwest Americana, finely illustrated books from the 15th-19th centuries, and book arts. While the archives is particularly interested in strengthening these collections, all fine and rare editions will be considered for acquisition.

Completion and submission of a records transfer form will help us determine how records or personal papers can best be preserved. When possible, send us this form (and if applicable, a box/folder list) prior to sending records. If you have any questions about the form, please contact the Archives.

Writing Your Thesis

by Danielle Hirano  Oct 14 15

Honors Thesis Guidelines

Don’t forget to read the Honors Thesis Guidelines. These guidelines, specific to those writing honors theses, will tell you everything you need to know about formatting and submitting your thesis. Also see our Senior Thesis Guide for an overview of the thesis process and detailed links to library resources for all thesis writers.

Choosing a Topic

Reference Librarians and thesis advisors can be invaluable resources as you prepare to write your thesis. The key to making thesis writing a relatively painless process lies in planning ahead. Come talk to a librarian early on. We can help you choose a topic, narrow your topic to a more reasonable size, locate resources both here at Whitman and in other libraries, and plan the research process so it all runs smoothly. Contact the reference department as soon as you can to set up a research consultation.

Start your research early, and plan ahead. The University of Minnesota has a useful Assignment Calculator that will help you manage time constraints

Sometimes choosing a topic can seem like the most difficult part of the whole process. Looking at other theses can give you some ideas about scope, arrangement, and depth of projects that qualify for Honors, and can really help you narrow your ideas to something you can research. You can find previous theses in Sherlock.

Finding Resources

Penrose Library contains a wealth of material that will be useful to you as your research your thesis topic, but finding exactly what you need can be daunting. We can help you search databases, indexes, and catalogs to find books, government documents, bibliographies, articles, and more. We can even help you locate resources held in other libraries.

When looking for books and collections, begin with resources available in Sherlock. For many topics, Penrose Library will have a sufficient amount of material. Having trouble finding books in the library? Check out our guide to Finding Books on the Shelves.

We also subscribe to many electronic databases specific to various disciplines. If you’re not sure which database will be best for your topic, or if you need help searching, come by the reference desk or make an appointment with a librarian.

Senior Privileges

All seniors working on theses are entitled to additional library privileges:

  • Semester-long checkout of Penrose Library books. This does not extend to books borrowed via Summit or interlibrary loan.
  • Year-long use of a locker in the library—Very handy if you don’t want to carry three dozen books around with you all the time. (Please make sure all the books in your locker are actually checked out to you.)

To apply for a locker and semester-long check out rights, please fill out our Senior Privileges form (PDF).

Library Services

by Danielle Hirano  Oct 14 15
In brief,Top 10 Things for Students to Know about Penrose Library.

Borrow & Request

Penrose Library extends borrowing privileges to all Whitman College students, faculty, and staff members. Although the Library’s primary commitment is to members of the Whitman community, certain library privileges are available to visiting scholars, local high school students, and members of the general public.

Library Cards

A valid Whitman ID or Penrose Library card is required to borrow materials from Penrose Library. ID cards are not transferable and may not be used by anyone other than the person to whom they were issued. A valid ID or library card must be presented every time materials are borrowed.

Cards must be validated for use at the Penrose Library Circulation Desk before they can be used. Any questions or concerns about ID or Library cards should be directed to the Circulation desk (509-527-5192).

Library users assume responsibility for notifying the Library of change of address, loss or theft of ID or library cards, and loss or theft of library materials they have borrowed. Library users also accept responsibility for materials borrowed on their ID card and for returning the materials to the Library by the due date.

Students, Faculty, and Staff will be issued a Whitman ID through the Human Resources Office and Campus Security. Alumni Borrowers are issued ID cards through the Alumni Office & Campus Security. Community Borrowers may purchase a library card at the Circulation Desk. Cards will be issued upon completion of an application form, presentation of photo ID, and payment of appropriate fees. Community members under the age of 18 must have a parent present to be issued a card. Please see our Community Borrowing page for more information.

Loan Periods

Loan periods differ by patron type.

Students can borrow books for six weeks and DVDs and videos for six days. Senior thesis students can borrow books for up to one semester.

Faculty can borrow books for the duration of one year, due at the end of the spring semester. DVDs and videos can be borrowed for seven days.

Staff can borrow books for six weeks and DVDs and videos for six days. Staff cannot check out items that have been placed on Reserve for a course.

Alumni can borrow books for six weeks and DVDs and videos for six days. Alumni cannot check out items that have been placed on Reserve for a course. Summit and Interlibrary Loan borrowing are not available to Alumni.

Community Members can borrow books for six weeks and DVDs and videos for six days. Community members cannot check out items that have been placed on Reserve for a course. Summit and Interlibrary Loan borrowing are not available to Community members.

Check-out Limits

Students can borrow up to 100 items at a time.

Faculty have no limit on the number of items that can be borrowed.

Staff can borrow up to 15 items at a time.

Alumni can borrow up to 15 items at a time.

Community members can borrow up to 5 items at a time.

To view a full list of library materials checked out to you, verify due dates, or check fines, log into your library account.


The Whitman College Library lending periods are intended to allow scholars convenient long-term use of library materials. In order to assure reasonable access to the library’s collections for all users, the Library offers several resopnses to the competition for materials. Items known to be in heavy demand, especially for course assignments, should be placed on Reserve. Items on reserve have shorter loan periods, allowing wider access to materials.

Patrons needing items that are checked out may search the Summit catalog via Sherlock and request a copy from another institution (find out more about Summit borrowing).

If there is heavy demand for a title, please feel free to suggest that the Library acquire additional copies.

If you need an item that is checked out, you may recall the item using the Request Item button in the Penrose catalog. The current borrower is required to return the item within a short period.

Notification of Recall
Borrowers will be notified immediately by email that the item they have checked out has been recalled. The item must be returned by the date specified in the recall notification, usually within five days of the receiving notice. Items needed for Reserve will be recalled immediately.

Minimum Use
Borrowers will not receive recall notices for one week from the time of original check-out.

Failure to return a recalled item by the specified due date will result in a $5.00 per day fine. Fines will accumulate until the replacement cost of the item has been reached, or the item is returned.


Renewals are no longer available for students, alumni, staff and community members. To match the loan rules of Summit, as of Summer 2014, the loan period for books has been increased to 6 weeks with no renewals. Please contact Access Services at 509-527-5192 or [email protected] with questions.

Faculty may renew Whitman books twice, but books must be returned at the end of the spring semester after the third year from original checkout. While faculty may renew books for up to three years, the Library must balance the need for researchers’ long-term use of library materials against our need to periodically review the condition of materials. We strongly encourage their return for use by others.

Overdue Fines and Replacement Fees

All overdue items are subject to fines, which vary according to materials type.

  • Books are subject to a $0.25 per day fine.
  • DVDs and videos are subject to a $1.00 per day fine.
  • Hourly reserves are subject to a $0.25 per hour fine.
  • Daily reserves are subject to a $1.00 per day fine.
  • Recalled items are subject to a $5.00 per day fine.
  • Summit and ILL materials are subject to a $0.50 per day fine for the first 10 days; $1.00 per day for the next 15 days; $30 maximum fine.

Faculty are not charged general overdue fines for materials held by Penrose Library. However, all faculty are subject to recall overdue fines as well as overdue fines for Summit & Interlibrary loan materials.

If a Penrose item is lost or stolen, the minimum Item Replacement Fee is $75.00 or the actual price of the item, if greater. An additional, non-refundable $15.00 processing fee per item is charged.

Summit and Interlibrary Loan materials which are lost or stolen incur a minimum of $110 per item replacement fee, or the actual price of the item, if greater.

Suspension of Circulation Privileges

Library privileges will be suspended when your library account accrues $20.00 or more in fines, until partial or complete payment is made. Please pay all fines at the Penrose Circulation Desk. (Outstanding charges on student accounts will be transferred to your college bill at the end of each semester. Faculty are not subject to suspension.)

Replacement items that are charged to your library account will block your ability to borrow Summit and Interlibrary Loan materials.

The immediate return of billed items will clear the replacement charge. when returning a billed item, please speak with the Circulation Supervisor to make certain that the charge has been cleared from your Library account. Refunds will not be issued if the book has been lost for more than one year.

Please direct questions about replacement costs and billing to the Access Services Manager.

Confidentiality of Circulation Records

Penrose Library is committed to the protection of the privacy rights of all of its students, faculty, staff, and other library users. In compliance with Washington State R.C.W. 42.17.310(1), the Washington State Public Disclosure Act, and in accordance with the American Library Association policy on the “Confidentiality of Library Records,” all library records are considered to be confidential transactions. Library staff will not release the name of any person to whom an item is currently charged, nor will they release past circulation records (including Interlibrary Loans) except pursuant to court order, search warrant, or subpoena. Requests for confidential circulation records from a federal, state, or local law enforcement agency should be referred to the College Librarian.

Summit and ILL

Using Summit and Interlibrary Loan

If we don’t have what you need at Penrose, you can borrow most materials from Summit or Interlibrary Loan (ILL). Keep in mind that borrowing from other libraries takes time, and will require that you plan ahead.

Requesting from Summit

You can request Summit items directly from within Sherlock using the Summit request link.

  • Summit materials take between 5 and 7 days to arrive.
  • Most Summit materials circulate for 6 weeks with no renewals.
  • Summit DVDs and Videos circulate for 6 days with no renewals.
  • Patrons with fines in excess of $20 cannot borrow from Summit.
  • Summit is available only for current students, faculty, and staff.
  • Items available at Penrose cannot be borrowed from Summit.
  • When your item has arrived, it will be held for 5 days before being sent back to the lending library.
  • Overdue Summit items will be charged $0.50 per day for the first 10 days, and $1 per day for the next 15 days. The maximum fine is $30 per item.
  • If a book is lost or not returned, you will be charged a fee of $110 (or more, if the replacement cost is higher than average).
Requesting from Interlibrary Loan (ILL)

If the item you want isn’t available from a Summit library, you’ll need to request it from Interlibrary Loan. You can request items from ILL through the Sherlock, or by searching WorldCat; just look for the button that says “Request from Interlibrary Loan”.

Journal articles are not available through Summit, and must be obtained from ILL. You can request journal articles not available at Penrose directly from the database you’re searching, by clicking the “ILLiad Interlibrary Loan link” for articles.

Log in with your Whitman username and email password.The item information will be filled out in the ILL form for you. Just verify the information is correct and submit your request.

Materials such as books and DVDs can be loaned in their original format. Articles in journals or on microfilm will be photocopied or sent electronically.

The time it takes to receive ILL materials can vary widely, so be sure to plan ahead if you think you’ll need to borrow from ILL. Some articles may arrive in just a few days, but other materials may take up to six weeks.

Access Services handles all requests for Whitman faculty, staff and students at no charge. Any requests can be made online and picked up at the Whitman Circulation desk.

ILL items circulate to all patrons for 6 weeks with no renewals. Occasionally, restrictions on photocopying or use outside of Penrose may exist.Older and archival materials, reference materials, original newspapers and journals, and theses and dissertations are frequently unavailable. Some materials may also be unavailable due to copyright restrictions.

Technology Services

Borrowing Laptops and other Equipment

Laptops are available for student check-out through the WCTS staffed Technology Support Desk in the Library. These computers are available for four-hour use within the Library only and are checked-out on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, please see the WCTS Library Computer Facilities page.

Students requiring media equipment to support technology-intensive work should contact WCTS.

Technology Support Desk Hours:
Monday-Thursday: 9am-midnight
Friday: 9am-5pm
Saturday: 10am-5pm
Sunday: 10am-midnight


Over 40 computers are located in carrels throughout the Library and are available for student use. All are on the campus network, and have access to Library and internet resources, as well as to high-speed printing. Additionally, Penrose Library offers wireless network access throughout the building. Four public access kiosk machines are available for searching the Library’s catalog, brief web browsing, or email. These workstations have a 15 minute time limit. For additional information, please see the WCTS Library Computer Facilities page.


A walk-up color scanning station is available on the second floor of the library. The scanner has a 17”X24” scan area and allows scans to be saved as multiple file types including .jpg, .txt and .pdf. Scans can be saved to a USB flash drive or sent via email. There is no charge to scan materials.


Penrose has three black and white copiers on the Main Floor. Students are encouraged to purchase copy cards from the Circulation Desk in increments of $2 and $5. Double-sided copying is encouraged. Copies cost 5 cents per printed side. A color copier may be found in the Instructional Media Services Department in Hunter Conservatory.


High-speed printers are available on each floor of Penrose Library. Printed pages are 5 cents each for one-sided black and white pages, or 10 cents for two-sided (duplex) sheets. Printers default to double-sided printing.

Fax Machine

Fax service is available for students at the Penrose Circulation Desk. Charges for a domestic fax are $1 for the first page and 50 cents for each subsequent page. Faxes which are sent to international locations are charged at a rate of $5 for the first page and $1 for each subsequent page.

Study Rooms, Supplies, & Lockers

Group Study and Media Rooms

Penrose Library has eight large group study rooms available for groups of two or more students to use on a first-come, first-served basis. Three media viewing rooms for individual students are also available. Keys for the rooms may be checked out at the Circulation Desk for a three-hour time period, and may be renewed once, provided no one else is waiting to use the room.


A limited number of supplies may be purchased at the Circulation Desk. These include laptop locks, headphones, thumb drives, and blank CD/DVDs. Please inquire at the desk.

Student Lockers

Penrose Library has 164 lockers available to Whitman College seniors who are writing a thesis. The lockers are located on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th floors and are assigned throughout the year according to need. To receive a key, the student must come to the Circulation Desk and present a Whitman College ID and a signed Senior Privileges Form to a Circulation Supervisor.

Failure to comply with the locker policy may result in the loss of locker privileges.

  • Library books must be checked out to a student or they will be removed.
  • No food, beverages, alcohol, or illegal substances may be kept in lockers.
  • Lockers are subject to periodic inspections by Library staff.
  • Library journals, reference books, or other restricted library materials may not be retained in lockers. If any of these materials are found in the lockers, they will be removed and returned to the collection.
  • Students who do not return the key by the due date will be fined. A $31 replacement fee will be charged if the key is lost or stolen.

Information for faculty

Please refer to the Faculty Services page.

Off-campus Access

Whitman College uses a proxy server to provide access to materials for which we pay subscription fees. To use Whitman resources from off campus, you should access them from the library website. You will be automatically sent to a log in screen: Use your Whitman email username and password to log in.

To report problems accessing resources from off campus, please contact the Systems Librarian.

Community Library Use

Penrose Library makes certain resources available to visiting scholars, local high school students, and members of the community. In order to borrow from Penrose Library, you must have a valid Penrose Library Community Borrowing card.

Library cards may be purchased at the Penrose Library Circulation Desk. Cards will be issued upon completion of an application form, presentation of photo ID, and payment of appropriate fees. Community members under the age of 18 must have a parent present to be issued a card. Any questions or concerns about Library ID cards or general circulation issues should be directed to Access Services at [email protected] or 509-527-5192.

Library users assume responsibility for notifying the Library of change of address, loss or theft of Library ID card, and loss or theft of library materials they have borrowed. Library users also accept responsibility for materials borrowed on their ID card and for returning materials to the Library by the due date.

Community Borrowing Rates – Annual Fees
  • Area high school students: $10 (Under 18 must be accompanied by a parent)
  • Area elementary and high school teachers: $25
  • Walla Walla Community College students and faculty: $25
  • Walla Walla University students and faculty: reciprocal borrowing agreement (valid ID required)
  • Members of the general public: $45
  • Orbis Cascade Alliance & NAPCU libraries – reciprocal borrowing agreement (valid ID required)
  • Spouses/partners/family members of Whitman employees – no charge

Summit and Interlibrary Loan borrowing are not available to Community Borrowing members of Penrose. Community members may check out up to five items at a time. Library privileges will be suspended for any patron accruing $5 or more in fines, until partial or complete payment is made. Please pay all fines at the Penrose Circulation Desk.

Notifications of recalls, fines and bills will be by e-mail whenever an e-mail address is available; otherwise United States Postal Service will be used. It is the responsibility of the borrower to ensure the library information on file concerning addresses and phone numbers is current and accurate.

Library Use Policy

Penrose Library is committed to maintaining collections that exist as common resources to be shared, preserved, and respected in a manner guaranteeing protection for future users. The ethical use of library materials involves acceptance of this principle and appropriate conduct regarding library collections. We are committed to providing a space for the Whitman community to study, collaborate, and research.

  • Food and beverages must be covered and kept in spill-proof containers.
  • Smoking or the use of tobacco is not permitted in Penrose Library.
  • The Allen Reading Room is designated as a quiet study area in the library. Please be courteous of other library visitors who prefer to work in a quiet area.
Circulation and Access Policies

Please see our Borrow & Request section for information how to borrow materials, loan periods, fines, and other borrowing policies.

Inappropriate Use of Library Materials

Inappropriate use includes, but is not limited to:

  • Writing upon, defacing, tearing, cutting, mutilating, or destroying books or other library property
  • The willful concealment of a book or other library property on one’s person or among one’s belongings while attempting to leave, or leaving the premises of the Library without formal borrowing through the Circulation Desk
  • The willful concealment of a book or other Library property within the Library
  • The willful removal of a book or other Library property in contravention to Library regulations
  • The intentional alteration or destruction of library ownership records

Engaging in inappropriate use of materials will jeopardize library borrowing privileges.

Doing Research

by Danielle Hirano  Oct 14 15
Subject Guides by Department

Penrose Library subscribes to hundreds of journals and databases. Many articles are available in full-text online.

Writing Your Thesis

Are you writing a thesis this year? You can find all the help you need at Penrose Library.

Citing Sources

We have guides and tips to help you learn to format your research papers and cite sources correctly.

Copyright Guidance

We’ve put together some great resources to help you navigate copyright in your academic and personal life, including fair use analysis tools and sample copyright request forms.

Off-Campus Access

Find troubleshooting tips and contact information for accessing electronic resources off campus.

Schedule a Research Appointment

Our Librarians are available to assist you with research topics, projects, and papers Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm. Drop-in visits are welcome too!

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